Local postdoc to international hipster postdoc

The positions we advertise on our site span the globe (not yet space). Whether you are just beginning your career, or you are established in academia, there can be a strong appeal to gain international experience. International experience brings career benefits as well as personal growth and satisfaction. Getting an international perspective can also bring benefits to your family.

When Dr Natalie Matosin was preparing for her recent move from Sydney to Munich, she had a Twitter chat with three others who have already trodden the path from local postdoc to international hipster postdoc.

Natalie’s post opens with a profile introduction on the people who took part in the chat, all of whom have a lot of international experience. The topics covered both the emotional and practical elements of making an international move.

Key pieces of advice that Natalie highlights are: –
• moving is expensive
• it takes time to get the first paper out after moving country
• work with people you like and trust
• take the time to settle in

Here’s what Natalie asked the participants: –

Q:  How long should I expect it to take to settle into lab and home life?
Q:  Relocating is a big move and so productivity is obviously going to be affected. What did you do to keep everything rolling, or what didn’t you do that you would do differently if you were moving again?
Q:  Anytime a scientist changes jobs, there is usually a heap of data from the old group which carries over (I.e. Papers and projects). How did you manage this during your move? Did you get to a point where you stopped doing old work and focused on the new?
Q:  What was your approach to collaborations? Did you take on everything offered, did you actively have to go out and make it happen, or were you careful about what type of work you added to your load?
Q:  Are there any other challenges you faced in or out of the lab?
Q:  Do you have any advice on applying for grants (particularly the importance and timing) and/or building overseas networks?
Q:  Part of being a postdoc and moving towards group leader is starting to have your own group. What is your opinion on supervising students after relocating?
Q:  If you had to give a single piece of critical advice to ensure success in your overseas position, what would it be?

Click here to read the participants responses.

Diana Hayes
A key part of the founding team, Diana is achievement-oriented, forward-thinking and strategic in creating a high-yielding network of interested academics, universities and related associations. Her research and content have created genuine engagement amongst both candidates and employers resulting in a network of 250,000 academics. Diana’s experience is in sales, marketing, event management and business development.

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